Squatters moving into foreclosed, abandoned Collier homes without permission

Scott McIntyre/Staff 
 Steve Carr, right, checks the pools depth at a vacant home in North Naples on Friday June 8, 2012 while he and Amber Holt work to clear the home. Holt and Carr are hired through private companies to clear vacant homes along with cutting the grass. Occasionally they run into squatters before they begin to clear the homes. The Collier County Sheriff's Office have received calls of late about property owners, managers or Realtors showing up at supposedly vacant homes on the market or in foreclosure only to find someone living there..

Photo by SCOTT MCINTYRE // Buy this photo

Scott McIntyre/Staff Steve Carr, right, checks the pools depth at a vacant home in North Naples on Friday June 8, 2012 while he and Amber Holt work to clear the home. Holt and Carr are hired through private companies to clear vacant homes along with cutting the grass. Occasionally they run into squatters before they begin to clear the homes. The Collier County Sheriff's Office have received calls of late about property owners, managers or Realtors showing up at supposedly vacant homes on the market or in foreclosure only to find someone living there..

Vacant homes, January to March 2012

Golden Gate: 144

Immokalee: 99

North Naples: 124

Golden Gate Estates: 389

East Naples: 201

Total: 957

Source: Collier County Code Enforcement

— Grass has crept up between the edges of interlocked pavers leading to a butterscotch house on Trail Boulevard in North Naples. The white trim on the gabled roof is splintering, fire ants scurry throughout the porch and interior, and a ball is floating in a pool that now functions only as a petri dish for muck and bugs.

A family lived there, once. The basketball hoop on the edge of the pool suggests it, and neighbors confirmed it.

But when Amber Holt showed up this spring to clean out the foreclosure home for a bank, she found a man who had set up camp inside — a squatter.

"He had a pallet and all his stuff in the front room," said Holt, who along with her business partner has been hired by a bank to clean up scores of foreclosed homes from Marco Island to north Collier, to Immokalee. The man ran out when she walked in.

Even with no electricity, abandoned homes can become temporary lodging for unapproved inhabitants. Sheriff's reports and anecdotes show squatters are staking a claim to abandoned homes in Collier — there were about 950 vacant properties in the first quarter of 2012, according to Collier County Code Enforcement.

A call came into the Collier Sheriff's Office on May 18 that two men were taking appliances out of the Trail Boulevard home — the same one Holt was hired to clean up. She and her partner had run into the suspected thieves as they hauled out a dishwasher. The men weren't the squatters, though.

Stephen Adams, 31, of Golden Gate, is charged with burglary, grand theft, and two drug counts. Adams told deputies the dishwasher was going to be scrapped for money, according to the arrest report.

While Collier deputies were at the scene of a reported burglary and theft, a man and a woman showed up and admitted they were squatters living in the home, according to an arrest report of the accused thief. Deputies found bedding near the kitchen and food in the pantry.

While Collier deputies were at the scene, a man and a woman showed up and admitted they were squatters living in the home, according to Adams' arrest report. Deputies found bedding near the kitchen and food in the pantry.

Neighbor Mary Whisman, who with her husband has lived in a home on an adjacent lot for nearly seven years, said she saw cars in the driveway of the home from time to time, but assumed it was people checking out the property. Squatters, though?

"I never saw a soul," she said.

The prior owners — a young couple with children, she recalled — redid the pool, overhauled the septic system, improved the lawn — then disappeared.

They bought the home in 2005 for $1,250,000 — it's now valued at about $513,000, according to the Collier County Property Appraiser. The bank now owns the home, the couple that lived there as squatters told deputies in late May.Collier court records show the home was foreclosed on in 2009.

Though the Sheriff's Office only has records of two other cases labeled as "squatters" since September 2011, Holt estimated about 20 percent to 30 percent of the 40 homes she cleans out and secures each month show signs of unapproved inhabitants.

There was the man with camouflage belongings and an "arsenal" of weapons, including several machetes. There was a family with children's faces pressed to the windows as Holt showed up, the matriarch telling her to get off the property. And there was the home where the electric bill had been paid up and there were cold beers in the refrigerator, with a nice stereo system nearby.

Holt and her business partner, Steve Carr, don't confront squatters intentionally. Some squatters have run out as Holt and Carr entered homes, unaware of inhabitants. Other times, upon seeing belongings or dwellers, they have called the police or the bank to deal with them. Fixing windows, changing locks, and cleaning out murky pools are all in their job description. Kicking out squatters isn't.

"Some are homeless. Some are families that have no place to go," Holt said.

Holt and Carr surmise that squatters aren't the ones clearing out appliances to sell for scrap, like the man arrested on Trail Boulevard.

Whether theft and squatting go hand in hand isn't clear, though that's indicated in a case in East Naples from late last year.

Deputies were called in December 2011 to a home on Weeks Avenue in East Naples. There was hamburger thawing and a few empty TV dinner boxes. But the owners were at their second home in Ohio.

Deputies were called in December 2011 to a home on Weeks Avenue in East Naples. There was hamburger thawing and a few empty TV dinner boxes. But the owners were at their second home in Ohio

Kirkland Wilson, an area Realtor who checks on the residence for the Ohio couple when they are out of town, had last visited in late November.

"I pretty much knew what it was when I came across it. There were a lot of indicators," Wilson said.

There was a small slit in the screen door to the lanai that allowed someone to unlock it. Then a sliding glass door to the dining room had been lifted off its tracks, according to a Sheriff's Office report.

A light was on in the spare bedroom, and the responding deputy surmised there was possibly someone "sleeping at the residence or at least squatting for some time." Cigarette butts on the bathroom floor were collected for evidence, but no suspect was named or caught. Bikes, tools, a video game console, and DVDs were reported missing from the home.

"If you can watch a place 48 hours, you can know whether you can stay in it," Wilson, a former Los Angeles police officer, said of unapproved occupants.

Scott McIntyre/Staff 
 Amber Holt, right, and Steve Carr unload wood that will be used to cover the pool area of a vacant home in North Naples on Friday June 8, 2012. Holt and Carr are hired through private companies to clear vacant homes along with cutting the grass. Occasionally they run into squatters before they begin to clear the homes. The Collier County Sheriff's Office have received calls of late about property owners, managers or realtors showing up at supposedly vacant homes on the market or in foreclosure only to find someone living there..

Photo by SCOTT MCINTYRE // Buy this photo

Scott McIntyre/Staff Amber Holt, right, and Steve Carr unload wood that will be used to cover the pool area of a vacant home in North Naples on Friday June 8, 2012. Holt and Carr are hired through private companies to clear vacant homes along with cutting the grass. Occasionally they run into squatters before they begin to clear the homes. The Collier County Sheriff's Office have received calls of late about property owners, managers or realtors showing up at supposedly vacant homes on the market or in foreclosure only to find someone living there..

The Weeks Avenue case has made him a lot more wary, he added.

When he and his wife were looking for a home last year, they came across one or two that seemed to have unauthorized inhabitants — to the surprise of the real estate agent. Yet it wasn't until he discovered the Weeks Avenue squatter that he has become more diligent about visiting the homes he watches or is trying to sell.

"I check in a lot more frequently," Wilson said.

Lt. Rich Hampton with the Collier Sheriff's Office, oversees District 2, which includes parts of Golden Gate and Golden Gate Estates – areas that together account for a majority of the vacant homes in Collier County.

Deputies in his district come across squatters every week or two, and use discretion when handling the situation, which under Florida law is trespassing, he said.

"If you have someone that is just a transient, seeking shelter in inclement weather, we try to get services for them," Hampton said, referring to homeless shelters and other local service providers. A trespass warning may be given and the squatter's personal information noted.

"When we show up because someone has moved in, we have to treat that like a crime. Period," he added. Arrests can be made for burglary, theft, and trespassing if the situation warrants it, Hampton explained.

In at least one instance, a property owner in East Naples wanted a squatter on his property — though not inside the building — to get help, rather than be arrested, and deputies only issued the squatter a warning, Hampton recalled.

It was the right decision in that case, he believed.

"It's not like we get a big thrill seeing someone with no home going to jail," he said.

© 2012 Naples Daily News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 46

Max_Headroom writes:

Where are the numbers for homes WEST of 41? Just because they are closer to the beach doesn't mean they are immune to squatters. Probably more so since the value/payments were higher.

Sick writes:

in response to Max_Headroom:

Where are the numbers for homes WEST of 41? Just because they are closer to the beach doesn't mean they are immune to squatters. Probably more so since the value/payments were higher.

We don't have any. The neighbors have enough decency and money to keep them out.

GG on the other hand, wow at 390 vacant homes/people who took the bait from the bankers.

Thats an entire subdivision.

Yurko writes:

Doing a little research, the "foreclosed" house in question is at 6672 Trail Blvd. However, it is still listed as being privately owned -- not bank-owned. I know that it can take a few weeks for a change of ownership to show up on the Collier Appraiser website but, if the photo is from this property, it looks like it has been abandoned for a long time. If so, one would think that the bank ownership would already be listed in the records.

neapolitan100 writes:

What about the realtors charged with listing a short sale/potential foreclosure who illegally rent out these properties that they do not own? There is a scrap metal business taking place on Coral Wood Dr. at 5120. A no trespassing sign is posted on that disaster of a yard and the listing realtor hangs up on those who inquire. The owners of record listed the house for sale and left town long ago. At 5111 Coral Wood, the home is in foreclosure and the owner left long ago. Recently, people showed up and moved in. When residents call the county or sheriff's office they are told that nothing can be done.
Make no mistake the county and law enforcement are not handling this problem. Logan Woods is a nice area which is slowly being destroyed by illegal renting and squatting.

manforpeace writes:

This is a good thing, I love it.
If anyone is involved with the corrupt world of the foreclosure market, they know what I mean.
The banks are behind the mess, and continue to be.
If the market turned around to the good you can bet your bottom dollar these houses would be cleaned up and sold VERY quick.
The banks and the government know whats going on and will do nothing until they can make money. Thats the truth.
One thing you can count on is every foreclosed home will have NEW curly light bulbs when sold. They are more worried about that, rather than squatters.

nightranger writes:

in response to neapolitan100:

What about the realtors charged with listing a short sale/potential foreclosure who illegally rent out these properties that they do not own? There is a scrap metal business taking place on Coral Wood Dr. at 5120. A no trespassing sign is posted on that disaster of a yard and the listing realtor hangs up on those who inquire. The owners of record listed the house for sale and left town long ago. At 5111 Coral Wood, the home is in foreclosure and the owner left long ago. Recently, people showed up and moved in. When residents call the county or sheriff's office they are told that nothing can be done.
Make no mistake the county and law enforcement are not handling this problem. Logan Woods is a nice area which is slowly being destroyed by illegal renting and squatting.

I lived in Logan Woods from 1989- 1992 and then moved into a gated community. I did like the privacy but couldn't deal with the home break-ins
and the dogs always roaming the streets.

donate#252606 writes:

This is a really interesting problem for the County, but it's really easy problem to fix. And you ask, how can that be an easy problem to fix. Oh yes, absolutely. And very inexpensive. By the way.

All the local law enforcement have to get all the squatters out all the vacant homes, Collier County, or even the banks can do this to head on down to your local sporting goods store and purchase a very inexpensive item called a game camera. This device can be up set up at the property and basically records everything and anyone who enters the property to infrared beam of light when you pass to the slide it takes a nice HD quality picture of the individual who is walking up to the house this device cost around 39 $210, depending on what model you choose from. I do believe they even have some not that are on Wi-Fi and others that have the capability of sending you an e-mail whenever the device is activated. Wow what inexpensive solution to a big huge million-dollar problem of vandals and thieves squatters anybody who enters the property without permission and I'm sure the banks can afford a $39 investment to keep thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars of damage to the property owned by the way the things are very, very well camouflaged and you can put them in a tree you can hide them anywhere. It is plenty of places to put this camera where no one can see it and then you will have to worry about these poor guys going to cleanup all this garbage, trash in all these abandoned properties in Collier County is so funny that no one can ever come up with a soluble and sound solution to a very mundane problem.

Thank you for reading my comment.

And all have a great day.

Thank you.

kenny5000c writes:

in response to donate#252606:

This is a really interesting problem for the County, but it's really easy problem to fix. And you ask, how can that be an easy problem to fix. Oh yes, absolutely. And very inexpensive. By the way.

All the local law enforcement have to get all the squatters out all the vacant homes, Collier County, or even the banks can do this to head on down to your local sporting goods store and purchase a very inexpensive item called a game camera. This device can be up set up at the property and basically records everything and anyone who enters the property to infrared beam of light when you pass to the slide it takes a nice HD quality picture of the individual who is walking up to the house this device cost around 39 $210, depending on what model you choose from. I do believe they even have some not that are on Wi-Fi and others that have the capability of sending you an e-mail whenever the device is activated. Wow what inexpensive solution to a big huge million-dollar problem of vandals and thieves squatters anybody who enters the property without permission and I'm sure the banks can afford a $39 investment to keep thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars of damage to the property owned by the way the things are very, very well camouflaged and you can put them in a tree you can hide them anywhere. It is plenty of places to put this camera where no one can see it and then you will have to worry about these poor guys going to cleanup all this garbage, trash in all these abandoned properties in Collier County is so funny that no one can ever come up with a soluble and sound solution to a very mundane problem.

Thank you for reading my comment.

And all have a great day.

Thank you.

You would need electricity to be on at the house as well as an internet connection and a computer multiply that by 1000 homes and ask yourself if taxpayers should be paying for that.

The banks are at fault, they are dragging their feet taking title to the property so they don't have to pay taxes, maintenance, etc.

lilme writes:

in response to neapolitan100:

What about the realtors charged with listing a short sale/potential foreclosure who illegally rent out these properties that they do not own? There is a scrap metal business taking place on Coral Wood Dr. at 5120. A no trespassing sign is posted on that disaster of a yard and the listing realtor hangs up on those who inquire. The owners of record listed the house for sale and left town long ago. At 5111 Coral Wood, the home is in foreclosure and the owner left long ago. Recently, people showed up and moved in. When residents call the county or sheriff's office they are told that nothing can be done.
Make no mistake the county and law enforcement are not handling this problem. Logan Woods is a nice area which is slowly being destroyed by illegal renting and squatting.

Driving down Oakes Boulevard yesterday, we noticed a fresh tomale stand in front of a house. Don't know if it was the homeowner, renter, or squatter; or has it been zoned commercially? Why wouldn't Naples Board of Realtors be concerned about this?

manforpeace writes:

in response to donate#252606:

This is a really interesting problem for the County, but it's really easy problem to fix. And you ask, how can that be an easy problem to fix. Oh yes, absolutely. And very inexpensive. By the way.

All the local law enforcement have to get all the squatters out all the vacant homes, Collier County, or even the banks can do this to head on down to your local sporting goods store and purchase a very inexpensive item called a game camera. This device can be up set up at the property and basically records everything and anyone who enters the property to infrared beam of light when you pass to the slide it takes a nice HD quality picture of the individual who is walking up to the house this device cost around 39 $210, depending on what model you choose from. I do believe they even have some not that are on Wi-Fi and others that have the capability of sending you an e-mail whenever the device is activated. Wow what inexpensive solution to a big huge million-dollar problem of vandals and thieves squatters anybody who enters the property without permission and I'm sure the banks can afford a $39 investment to keep thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars of damage to the property owned by the way the things are very, very well camouflaged and you can put them in a tree you can hide them anywhere. It is plenty of places to put this camera where no one can see it and then you will have to worry about these poor guys going to cleanup all this garbage, trash in all these abandoned properties in Collier County is so funny that no one can ever come up with a soluble and sound solution to a very mundane problem.

Thank you for reading my comment.

And all have a great day.

Thank you.

The banks WILL NOT do that. You just don't get it. The banks WILL NOT get their hands dirty ever. They ONLY make money, they don't spend it, not even for a 10 dollar camera.

greathornedlizard writes:

in response to lilme:

Driving down Oakes Boulevard yesterday, we noticed a fresh tomale stand in front of a house. Don't know if it was the homeowner, renter, or squatter; or has it been zoned commercially? Why wouldn't Naples Board of Realtors be concerned about this?

I think there should be allowances to accomodate home made tamales.

HarryNuts writes:

in response to Sick:

We don't have any. The neighbors have enough decency and money to keep them out.

GG on the other hand, wow at 390 vacant homes/people who took the bait from the bankers.

Thats an entire subdivision.

LOL you are arrogant AND retarded

TiredoftheBS writes:

in response to onion:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

It is, don't you believe the plethora of articles saying so?

Captian_Cataracts writes:

Half a million bux for the featured house? Byte me!

I'll offer 1000 dollars to take it off the banks hands.

staghorn writes:

in response to onion:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

YOU should know that republican credo. "if you tell a lie three times it becomes the truth."

trader9 (Inactive) writes:

in response to staghorn:

YOU should know that republican credo. "if you tell a lie three times it becomes the truth."

But...but...but...these are "Occupiers".

They're "Entitled".

Company144 writes:

the homeless are everywhere especially in east naples. i can't even walk my dog in cambier park without homeless people wanting to talk to me and pet my dog etc. they are dirty, they have nothing to offer and they don't want to work. they all get food stamps and some of them sell the food to get cash for drugs. i want the police to move them out.

Klaatu writes:

The Better question here is:
WHY AREN'T THE BANKS GETTING CODE VIOLATION FINES ?

Why are the Banks not being held to the same standard as other code violators?

The Banks are not the victims here !
Massive widespread fraud has taken place.
Yet few have been charged. Why is that?

youwilltapout writes:

in response to Company144:

the homeless are everywhere especially in east naples. i can't even walk my dog in cambier park without homeless people wanting to talk to me and pet my dog etc. they are dirty, they have nothing to offer and they don't want to work. they all get food stamps and some of them sell the food to get cash for drugs. i want the police to move them out.

Sounds like you need to walk a German Sheppard or a pit bull instead of fluffy the ankle biter. Stand your ground.....with your dog and send a bum to the hospital. If he is going to be s-----, he better be tough!

Francophile2 writes:

in response to Sick:

We don't have any. The neighbors have enough decency and money to keep them out.

GG on the other hand, wow at 390 vacant homes/people who took the bait from the bankers.

Thats an entire subdivision.

Decent people help those less fortunate ... thank you for defining your neighborhood as having none of those qualities. Take notice.

Quietcat writes:

A home was recently foreclosed on in my neighborhood. It is a beautiful home that was owned by people that took great pride in the way it was kept but it is already deteriorating. My neighbors and I plan to keep an eye on it to prevent any of the problems outlined in this article. I suggest that other people keep themselves apprised of what is going on in their neighborhoods and not just assume people coming and going from abandoned houses belong there. I'm not suggesting confronting anyone, but potential squatters and thieves target places they think aren't being watched.

greathornedlizard writes:

in response to onion:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

that was so last election, since ownership dropped the dime they won't even mention Rick Scott's foibles until the silence becomes too embarrassing.

Crosby87 writes:

in response to Ludwig:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Pittbull is telling the truth!

Crosby87 writes:

in response to Crosby87:

Pittbull is telling the truth!

Sorry, I meant Pitbull.

BigMunch writes:

Have an empty home you need checked weekly by a non-smoker, responsible adult ?
We can do it for 10.00 a month. Only looking to take on a few more homes, as I have openings due to a few being sold. We send you a weekly email and will contact you if anything out oif the ordinary is observed. I always check the temperature inside, the appliances, and all the doors and windows. Also we post a schedule on the Fridge and it is signed every time we come to check.

TheLissack writes:

Forgive me for being sort of obstinate but by definition if one is "squatting" it is "without permission" ..... if there was permission it would NOT be squatting

Yet again our beloved NDN demonstrating a basic lack of journalism skills

FreshFace writes:

gas is more than $10.

happyinnorthnaples writes:

Well , finally, someone is bringing this problem to light. I am a home inspector for a handful of large banks, covering all of Collier county, including Marco, and southern Bonita. There are people breaking into homes in EVERY neighborhood, no matter the market value. I have gone to the same properties multiple times and then one day there is an entire family living in a home. They can call and turn on the power and water as long as there is no outstanding amount due. This problem is not going away. I have been on over 1000 inspections this year, and only one time has a neighbor asked me if they "can help me with something". Neighbors must me vigilant!!! There are a lot more homes being abandoned as we are writing this....

bluestreak writes:

in response to staghorn:

YOU should know that republican credo. "if you tell a lie three times it becomes the truth."

Isn't that the truth.

Only problem is...with Democrats the credo obviously is "if you tell a lie once, it becomes the truth."

Just like the saying goes about how to tell when a car salesman is telling a lie. When his lips move...

Likewise, you can tell when our current president is telling a lie... when his lips move.

blefebvre writes:

The title of this news article: Squatters moving into foreclosed, abandoned Collier homes without permission. NDN the definition of squatter is: A person who unlawfully occupies an uninhabited building or unused land..... therefore if they had permission they would not be squatters....duh!

silverback writes:

in response to Yurko:

Doing a little research, the "foreclosed" house in question is at 6672 Trail Blvd. However, it is still listed as being privately owned -- not bank-owned. I know that it can take a few weeks for a change of ownership to show up on the Collier Appraiser website but, if the photo is from this property, it looks like it has been abandoned for a long time. If so, one would think that the bank ownership would already be listed in the records.

A lot of that also depends on the bank. There are a number of vacancies where I live (West of 41) but we have significant fees. If the bank lists themselves as owners, they are responsible for the fees. They don't want that. The banks will go to extraordinary lengths avoid paying community fees and instead making the other residents pony up those fees.

Do we wonder why the law is tilted that way? Let's see who crafts the laws - - - WOW, it's bankers and lawyers - - Whoa, what a surprise. Now I am beginning to understand why everything they touch smell like rotting flesh.

unfatcat writes:

I'm not sure that squatters' rights aren't still actually legal, never having been taken off the books a century ago(I could be wrong.) This did use to be a method of ownership; but, someone would have to occupy a place for many, many years to be legal. The biggest problem with this theory today is that a large percentage of people don't live here 24/7. Will their homes be targeted? If banks are going to allow this, then they should pick a specific house. We cannot just have anyone going into anywhere that appears to be empty. "Stand your ground" situations will arise.

unfatcat writes:

in response to Yurko:

Doing a little research, the "foreclosed" house in question is at 6672 Trail Blvd. However, it is still listed as being privately owned -- not bank-owned. I know that it can take a few weeks for a change of ownership to show up on the Collier Appraiser website but, if the photo is from this property, it looks like it has been abandoned for a long time. If so, one would think that the bank ownership would already be listed in the records.

A couple of reason for that would be: 1) seasonal homes. People from other countries have to spend several months in their native country to maintain citizenship, so some have gone home; and American tourists have gone North.

2) Florida has the highest backlog of unfiled foreclosures of any state 14%. People have been living in places without paying for many months; while some probably found work and moved. This house is probably pre-foreclosure, meaning that it is waiting to be unloaded onto the market with the thousands of others.

jkalvin writes:

in response to Klaatu:

The Better question here is:
WHY AREN'T THE BANKS GETTING CODE VIOLATION FINES ?

Why are the Banks not being held to the same standard as other code violators?

The Banks are not the victims here !
Massive widespread fraud has taken place.
Yet few have been charged. Why is that?

Very good point. The property owner of record should be held to code, and pay fines appropriately. If that is enforced, the problem would solve itself.

Notthesame writes:

in response to neapolitan100:

What about the realtors charged with listing a short sale/potential foreclosure who illegally rent out these properties that they do not own? There is a scrap metal business taking place on Coral Wood Dr. at 5120. A no trespassing sign is posted on that disaster of a yard and the listing realtor hangs up on those who inquire. The owners of record listed the house for sale and left town long ago. At 5111 Coral Wood, the home is in foreclosure and the owner left long ago. Recently, people showed up and moved in. When residents call the county or sheriff's office they are told that nothing can be done.
Make no mistake the county and law enforcement are not handling this problem. Logan Woods is a nice area which is slowly being destroyed by illegal renting and squatting.

If there are people liivng in this location that do not belong there, call the sheriffs office, they are tresspassing. If they refuse to come out, then ask to talk to a supervisor on patrol in that area. or a detective.

vinnybumbotz writes:

in response to greathornedlizard:

I think there should be allowances to accomodate home made tamales.

That would explain the absence of stray animals in the area.

kenny5000c writes:

in response to Notthesame:

If there are people liivng in this location that do not belong there, call the sheriffs office, they are tresspassing. If they refuse to come out, then ask to talk to a supervisor on patrol in that area. or a detective.

I would think you would have to be either the owner or in legal possession of the property to have someone thrown off of the property.

wonderful (Inactive) writes:

in response to kenny5000c:

I would think you would have to be either the owner or in legal possession of the property to have someone thrown off of the property.

This should not matter as the economy is doing just fine?

And GITMO has thousands of acres chimed in vp bin biden!

Max_Headroom writes:

in response to Sick:

We don't have any. The neighbors have enough decency and money to keep them out.

GG on the other hand, wow at 390 vacant homes/people who took the bait from the bankers.

Thats an entire subdivision.

How can you even own/rent a home? In one of your first posts you, yourself, said that you only make $18,000 a year.

Notthesame writes:

in response to kenny5000c:

I would think you would have to be either the owner or in legal possession of the property to have someone thrown off of the property.

Thats why you call so the deputy's can find out if the people are there legally, its called trespassing or Burglary. Houses in foreclosure are still the responsibility of the owner until which time the bank is granted ownership by the courts, and squaters are criminals.

Beachglow writes:

I've seen firsthand how bank's do NOT take care of the properties. I couldn't help but wonder how in the world they could even sell them leting them go down in appearance and care so badly. Wood floors buckling, walls warping, mold, covered filthy pools, et cetera. The banks should be fined for all these code violations or is Collier County even taking care of that?

cupcake writes:

Banks don't care, they have these homes on the books at their old outdated values and use the 'cooked' books to leverage more money they get at little to no interest to invest in 'derivitives' that if they lose on, the taxpayers have to eat the losses. They're in heaven man!

cupcake writes:

I'm pretty sure Obama has a plan worked up to intern Syrian Refugees in Collier County, these houses will come in handy. Look for Falafel stands to replace the Taco stands.

HAL9000 writes:

in response to vinnybumbotz:

That would explain the absence of stray animals in the area.

This is just one of Bob Divale's ways of being facetious.

bigcat21 writes:

in response to Sick:

We don't have any. The neighbors have enough decency and money to keep them out.

GG on the other hand, wow at 390 vacant homes/people who took the bait from the bankers.

Thats an entire subdivision.

Golden gate estates to be specific, not golden gate, they are two different areas

reaper56 writes:

What about a family that has lost their jobs, lost their home, been evicted from a rental or foreclosed home and merely needs an ABANDONED home to stay in? What about that same family not stealing any appliances or other items but actually mowing the lawn and maintaining the same home while SQUATTING? Wouldn't that be better than having them thrown in jail, thousands of abandoned homes in disrepair and becoming crack houses?

There are thousands of families who are victims of a completely destroyed US economy with little hope of recovering.

But "good decent citizens" make sure that they cannot live in an abandoned house. Screw em right? They deserve it.

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